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Posts tagged painting

148 Notes

In its 9th year, the “BLAB!” group show comes to Copro Gallery in Santa Monica once again, featuring a selection of works by some well-known creators in the New Contemporary gallery scene. From Joe Sorren’s soft, storybook-like works to Ryan Heshka’s satirical, pulp-inspired scenes and Travis Lampe’s maniacal cartoon characters, the artists cover a broad range of styles that stem from the low brow and Pop Surrealist movements. Curated by art director, designer and editor Monte Beauchamp, the exhibition coincides with release of his third art anthology, BLAB World 3, which features the work of the aforementioned artists and many more. The exhibition opens on September 13 alongside Yoko d’Holbachie’s solo show “Genesis of Girls.” Take a look at our preview of both shows on Hi-Fructose.

599 Notes

863 Notes

Joaquin Jara paints, he sculpts, and he intervenes. His work is baroque, moody. It’s not morose as much as it’s inevitable. It’s based on an ashes-to-ashes-dust-to-dust esthetic. Art may be long, as the expression goes, but there’s nothing permanent about the organic process each piece describes. Read more on Hi-Fructose. 

1084 Notes

Originally from Korea, David Choong Lee (featured in HF Vol. 30) has been a staple of San Francisco’s art scene for the past 20 years. Known for his elaborate assemblages composed of individual paintings on boxes on different depths, Lee deftly blends figuration with abstract dreamscapes, inserting realistically-rendered figures into explosions of shapes and kaleidoscopic colors. For his latest body of work, however, Lee emptied his paintings of human presence. His solo show “Cosmic Dust,” opening at Luna Rienne Gallery in San Francisco on September 13, will feature a series of acrylic paintings on canvas that focus on Lee’s intergalactic worlds — untouched and uninhabited. Honing in on the psychedelic imagery that once served as a background for his figures, he unfurls pools of liquid rainbows, mysterious glowing orbs and powerful beams of light. His new work gives the sensation of touching down on another planet. See more on Hi-Fructose.

313 Notes

There’s a certain feeling that is triggered when the familiar is distorted and brought into the realm of the unfamiliar. The idea of the uncanny is exactly what Hungarian artistNaomi Devil is aiming to trigger with her latest series of oil paintings. Devil takes the subjects of classic painting and re-arranges them. Removed from their comfortable surroundings, the subjects find themselves among sleek amorphous blobs that billow behind and around them. The blobs almost threaten to absorb the subjects, who are given futuristic laser swords, body piercings and other anachronistic details that bring them further out of sync with their time periods. The end result resembles something from dystopian science fiction. See more on Hi-Fructose.

631 Notes

There seems to be a history running through Carmel Seymour’s water colors, but it’s hard to pin down. Somewhere in the hazy but sublime gap between art and illustration, the paintings suspend an alternate reality in the canvas’ mid-air, depicting some hyperreal folklore in a wash of negative space. Seymour’s conceit seems simple enough: she places contemporary figures, such as girls in jeans and sneakers, in some private oasis, perhaps the figures’ dream landscape or perhaps some alien planet. But the landscapes where her figures exist are not so much ‘scapes as objects; entities without a before or after. Her water colors are deployed in highly restrained and linear strokes to focus on details, and then exploded to disrupt the hyperrealism and maximize the medium’s atmospheric emphasis. The paintings have no clear beginning or end, but beg the question: what’s the story here?

See more on Hi-Fructose.

121 Notes

Russian-born artist Sergei Isupov investigates binaries in human relationships — male and female, good and evil, beautiful and grotesque. Using clay as both a material for three-dimensional expression and as a canvas for his illustrations, Isupov capitalizes on all properties of what he finds to be the most open medium. He sculpts human and animal figures, and then adds illustrations in glaze. The paintings diffuse into the clay’s surface, like tattoos on his sculptures’ skin. Taken together, the two- and three-dimensional elements of his work establish a compacted but powerful scene of emotions and narratives. Read more on Hi-Fructose.

263 Notes

Jana Brike sat down with us to discuss her studio practice, out of body experiences and the ancient wisdoms of Latvian culture in an exclusive interview. Read the feature and check out her new work for her upcoming solo show “After the End of Time” at FB69 Gallery. See more on Hi-Fructose.

379 Notes

Creepy creatures, spindly figures and quirky narratives compose the illustrations of Bill Carman. See more on Hi-Fructose.

753 Notes

Those who follow in the footsteps of the Old Masters would gasp at Seth Alverson’s raw depictions of the human body. From the Renaissance’s advancements in rendering the idealized anatomy to today’s Photoshopped magazine covers, Western culture has an ongoing obsession with depicting the nude figure in ways that few of us can actually live up to. Alverson throws these conventions out the window with his oil paintings. Read more on Hi-Fructose.