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Posts tagged painting

145 Notes

Dutch painter Chris Berens’s work (featured in our book Hi-Fructose Collected 3) can be described as storybook-like with a darker twist. His light, airy oil paintings have a luminescence about them, as if his figures and the spaces they inhabit have a crystalline translucency that imbues them a magical-feeling ambiance. Berens recently collaborated with best-selling young adult fiction author Kami Garcia on an illustration project. An artist herself, Garcia is a long-time admirer of Berens and asked him to create three new paintings to be reprinted in her forthcoming novel, Unmarked. We bring you a first look at these new pieces before they debut in the book, which hits stores later this week. See more on Hi-Fructose.

Dutch painter Chris Berens’s work (featured in our book Hi-Fructose Collected 3) can be described as storybook-like with a darker twist. His light, airy oil paintings have a luminescence about them, as if his figures and the spaces they inhabit have a crystalline translucency that imbues them a magical-feeling ambiance. Berens recently collaborated with best-selling young adult fiction author Kami Garcia on an illustration project. An artist herself, Garcia is a long-time admirer of Berens and asked him to create three new paintings to be reprinted in her forthcoming novel, Unmarked. We bring you a first look at these new pieces before they debut in the book, which hits stores later this week. See more on Hi-Fructose.

190 Notes

Hazy figures walk towards the viewer in John Wentz’s new series of oil paintings, their faces muddled as if conjured from some distant memory or last night’s dream. His solo show “Passages,” opening alongside Mike Davis’s “A Blind Man’s Journey” (see our recent studio visit with Davis here), is set to debut at San Francisco’s 111 Minna Galleryon October 3. Read more on Hi-Fructose

446 Notes

A self-described history nerd, Mike Davis is a San Francisco-based artist who paints scenes stuck in another time. His detailed oil paintings are rife with personal symbolism and minuscule narratives, evoking Renaissance painters such as Hieronymus Bosch and Pieter Aertsen. Though he emulates the Northern Renaissance masters, Davis is entirely self-taught. He forayed into painting in his early twenties as an off-shoot of his tattoo career. The founding owner of esteemed San Francisco shop Everlasting Tattoo, Davis currently splits his time between his craft and his fine art, using his paintings as a cathartic processing tool to digest the events of his personal life. Read more on Hi-Fructose.

211 Notes

Jenny Morgan’s (featured in HF Vol. 21) paintings reveal beauty in simplicity. She often depicts nude figures with poignant expressions, stylizing their bodies to fit her sunrise-hued palette in lieu of focusing on minuscule details like hairs and wrinkles. The simplification of her subjects gives her work a glossed-over effect that pushes it from objective realism into surreal territory. For her latest exhibition “The Golden Hour” at Plus Gallery in Denver, Morgan explored notions of spirituality and the cycle of life. While her major focus has always been faces, often using herself as a subject, her exhibition features a substantial amount of paintings of skulls, alluding to the fading nature of youth and the ephemerality of the body. Take a look at the work in the show below and check out “The Golden Hour” on view through October 18. See more on Hi-Fructose

485 Notes

Australian artist David “Meggs” Hooke, opened his solo exhibition “Spoiled Rotten” at Inner State Gallery in Detroit on September 19. Using explosive bursts of colors and raw layers of texture, “Spoiled Rotten” explores themes of consumerism and over-obsession with pop culture as Hooke takes iconic images such as Mickey Mouse and yellow smiley faces and exposes their disposability. Read more on Hi-Fructose.

207 Notes

Liu Guangguang was born in China’s Gansu province. He attended Lu Xun Academy of Fine Art. He lives and works in Shenyang and Beijing. He’s a member of the Beijing-based EDGE Creative Collective.

His recent work is about scale. His figures (and animals) go about their normal activity. They check their phones. They play cards. They get ready for bed. The people smile without a care in the world. Despite the normalcy of each image, something’s unusual, if not wrong. Either the figures have miniature heads or else their bodies are gigantic. Their fingers and necks are elongated. A few have huge eyes. One woman has the floppy ears and trunk of an elephant. Read more on Hi-Fructose.

339 Notes

Technicolor maven Maya Hayuk recently opened her solo show “Alles Klar” at Die Kunstagentin in Cologne, Germany. Sparsely hung on the gallery’s white, painted-brick walls, the painter and muralist’s neon creations have room to breath without overwhelming the viewer. After all, Hayuk almost solely uses neon hues, often overlapping them in kaleidoscopic patterns that subtly evoke folk art forms such as weaving. Each piece attracts the eye like a nexus of energy — as if Hayuk’s intense color choices have a sort of gravitational pull. On a mural created at the entrance of the gallery, Hayuk turns up the volume, subsuming a corner of the space in refracted rainbows. See more on Hi-Fructose.

163 Notes

“Masterworks: Defining a New Narrative” at the Long Beach Museum of Art (sponsored post)

Martin Wittfooth. The Aviary, 2013

Long Beach Museum of Art presents “Masterworks: Defining A New Narrative” (October 23, 2014 – February 1, 2015) curated by Nathan Spoor and co-curator Jeff McMillan. This is a unique exhibition of 14 large-scale paintings featuring accomplished artists who, for the last decade, have been exploring new narrative directions in painting. Each of the artists have been charged with providing a singular work that could be considered pivotal in their careers. Artists will include Esao Andrews, James Jean, Martin Wittfooth and more.

“Masterworks: Defining a New Narrative” at the Long Beach Museum of Art (sponsored post)

Martin Wittfooth. The Aviary, 2013

Long Beach Museum of Art presents “Masterworks: Defining A New Narrative” (October 23, 2014 – February 1, 2015) curated by Nathan Spoor and co-curator Jeff McMillan. This is a unique exhibition of 14 large-scale paintings featuring accomplished artists who, for the last decade, have been exploring new narrative directions in painting. Each of the artists have been charged with providing a singular work that could be considered pivotal in their careers. Artists will include Esao Andrews, James Jean, Martin Wittfooth and more.

586 Notes

Kehinde Wiley’s (Hi-Fructose Vol. 29) opulent portraiture subtly stirs the status quo. As an American artist, Wiley honed his craft in accordance with a legacy of Euro-centric art history that left him simultaneously awed and alienated. One would be hard-pressed to find a grandiose portrait of a person of color in the works of the Renaissance masters in the Met or the Louvre. This is the motivating factor of Wiley’s oeuvre: to elevate images of average people of African descent through his ornate depictions, exposing the singular beauty of his subjects through dramatic compositions that evoke the Baroque period.

While he started out this aesthetic exploration by scouting subjects in major US cities, Wiley’s art has taken him all over the world to work with people of the global African diaspora. His latest series, “The World Stage: Haiti” is currently on view at Roberts & Tilton Gallery in Culver City and features 12 new paintings based on his recent travels. Read more on Hi-Fructose

235 Notes

This Saturday, CHG Circa will debut “Giants Among Us,” a group show that challenged artists to interpret the figure of the giant and how it plays out in folklore, contemporary culture and their own mythology. Read more on Hi-Fructose.