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Posts tagged painting

167 Notes

Belgian artist Cindy Wright’s realist approach to her paintings is straightforward and traditional, but her subject matter imbues her work with an haunting, enigmatic ambiance. Wright is interested in death and decay. Her still lifes focus on single objects — one polished skull, a slab of fresh meat bleeding on the ground. Presented to us without context or an explanation, the morbid subjects exemplify the physicality of flesh. In this way, her work continues the Northern Renaissance tradition of vanitas paintings, still lifes meant to evoke the passage of time and one’s inevitable mortality. See more on Hi-Fructose.

321 Notes

Polish-born, German-based designer and illustrator Sebastian Onufszak has created graphics for dozens of big-name clients — from Karl Lagerfeld to Starbucks — but in his personal work, he pulls out all the stops. Onufszak’s chaotic drawings and paintings look as if the lid of his subconscious was taken off completely. Characters are piled together in an orgiastic cacophony of faces and limbs; every color of the rainbow is used liberally; loud, seemingly meaningless text is scrawled everywhere that it can fit. Calling his style dreamlike would be an understatement, as few of us have dreams quite this vivid. More on Hi-Fructose.

483 Notes

Bright flora bursts in Kent Williams’s paintings (featured in HF Vol. 21). Thick brushstrokes of hot pink, mint and navy hint at an arrangement of organic growths. Williams frequently positions his subjects in the outdoors, where they inhabit areas that seem wild and overgrown yet feel contained like miniature Edens. His characters fervently move as if enacting a frenetic dance performance, their motion captured by his expressive use of paint. While Williams has been widely recognized for his figurative work over the past 20 years, his first solo show with 101/Exhibit in Los Angeles, “How Human of You,” marks a shift into abstraction. Figures are still present in many of the works, but Williams removes the idea of time and place, instead suspending them in an imaginary space where his flamboyant color choices elicit a visceral, emotional response. See more on Hi-Fructose.

305 Notes

Sometimes our crassest jokes reveal our hidden anxieties, while other times we create beautiful rituals surrounding that which we fear. It’s human nature to make light of death in order to not be consumed by the often incomprehensible idea of mortality. Examining a spectrum of responses to this difficult subject, Seattle gallery Roq La Rue recently collaborated with The Piranha Shop for a touring exhibition, “Boxes of Death.” Featuring well-known artists from the Pop Surrealist and low brow currents — like Camille Rose Garcia, Isabel Samaras and Casey Weldon — the show hit stops in LA, Portland and San Francisco and will be exhibited in Seattle for one night only at The Piranha Shop tomorrow, October 17. Read more on Hi-Fructose.

213 Notes

Though research has emerged linking excessive social media use with anxiety and depression, our collective internet addiction shows no sign of slowing down. The fictionalized, digital selves we present to the online world comprise the bulk of some people’s social interactions. Australian artist Robin Eley interrogates the divide between one’s physical and digital identity in his new show “Prism,” opening at 101/Exhibit’sHollywood location on October 18. Read more on Hi-Fructose.

208 Notes

It’s blistering cold outside, but the whiskey is keeping you warm and the crackling of the record player is drowning out the howling wind outside. Jonathan Viner’s new paintings for his upcoming solo show “Cold Snap” immerses the viewer in stylized, retro images of this sort of wintery paradise. Filled with nostalgic imagery and elements of ’70s counterculture, his paintings are rife with intrigue amid their idyllic milieu. The works take on an illustrative quality as they let viewers in on an art theft in progress or what looks like an erotic encounter gone awry. “Cold Snap” opens at Sloan Fine Art in New York on October 24 and will be on view through November 2. See more on Hi-Fructose.

122 Notes

LA mural organizers Branded Arts are curating an enormous pop-up show for a good cause. Featuring some of the most talked-about artists from the street art and new contemporary art movements, the event will take place the night of October 25 at Hollywood’s TCL Chinese Theatre. One can expect to find stencil works by Banksy hanging next to Andrew Hem’s luminous paintings, Dabs Myla’s cartoony creations, Buff Monster’s jolly blobs and Swoon’s assemblages, just to name a few examples. Plus, Talib Kweli will be DJing. Proceeds from the event will benefit Vista Del Mar Child and Family Services. Take a look at a sneak peek of the artwork in the show on Hi-Fructose.

327 Notes

Thursday night’s opening of Alex Gross’s “Future Tense” at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York’s Chelsea district greeted viewers with a heavy dose of consumer culture. The exhibition initially comes off as accessible and playfully reflective of modern addictions, yet the works as a group are rather grim and much harder to swallow than their glossy, candy-colored exteriors would suggest. Read more on Hi-Fructose.

115 Notes

Turn The Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose Exhibition

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(above image by Martin Wittfooth) 
We’re pleased to Announce: Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose at the The Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA)! See more here and more info. coming soon!: http://www.virginiamoca.org/turn-page-first-ten-years-hi-fructose
MAY 30, 2016 – DEC. 27, 2016

The Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) will feature some of the foremost contemporary artists through a ten year retrospective of the art magazine, Hi-Fructose. This exhibition is a unique opportunity to bring a broad spectrum of artwork by over 50 artists from the pages of magazines and computer screens to the walls of a contemporary art museum dedicated to educating on the significant art of today. Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose is a collaborative initiative by two like-minded organizations – MOCA in Virginia Beach, Virginia, and Hi-Fructose The New Contemporary Art Magazine in San Francisco, California.

365 Notes

Modern day mermaids, Victor Grasso’s subjects are painted with accoutrements culled from the deep. One model sits in a graceful yet slouchy pose that evokes the dramatic posturing of both Renaissance portraiture and fashion editorials. A shark’s jaw bones frame her face like a couture accessory that complements her ruffled gown and sheer veil. In other pieces, shiny, sinewy squid bodies make headdresses and stoles for women who, bafflingly, seem to wear them with confidence and ease. Grasso (who is self-taught, by the way) paints these characters with a photorealist quality, creating stark contrasts that evoke the reflections a bright flash causes on skin. The artist will have two new pieces featured in the group show “Size Matters,” opening at New York’s Arcadia Contemporary on October 16, and is currently working on a painting that will be shown atHashimoto Contemporary in San Francisco for the “LAX/SFO” group show curated byThinkspace, opening on October 31. See more on Hi-Fructose.

Modern day mermaids, Victor Grasso’s subjects are painted with accoutrements culled from the deep. One model sits in a graceful yet slouchy pose that evokes the dramatic posturing of both Renaissance portraiture and fashion editorials. A shark’s jaw bones frame her face like a couture accessory that complements her ruffled gown and sheer veil. In other pieces, shiny, sinewy squid bodies make headdresses and stoles for women who, bafflingly, seem to wear them with confidence and ease. Grasso (who is self-taught, by the way) paints these characters with a photorealist quality, creating stark contrasts that evoke the reflections a bright flash causes on skin. The artist will have two new pieces featured in the group show “Size Matters,” opening at New York’s Arcadia Contemporary on October 16, and is currently working on a painting that will be shown atHashimoto Contemporary in San Francisco for the “LAX/SFO” group show curated byThinkspace, opening on October 31. See more on Hi-Fructose.