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Posts tagged illustration

736 Notes

Yuko Shimizu’s bold illustrations… now on Hi-Fructose.

464 Notes

Julien Pacaud’s collages repurpose retro visuals. See more on Hi-Fructose.

414 Notes

Hong Kong-based art collective Parent’s Parents produce tight graphical work mixing graffiti art and comic characters. Read more about their work on Hi-Fructose.

1280 Notes

Mexican illustrator Smithe channels cyber punk and rock’n’roll influences in his artwork. See more on Hi-Fructose.

950 Notes

Alex Konahin’s Intensely-Ornate Ilustrations, now on Hi-Fructose.

99 Notes

View Low Bros’ current show at BC Gallery in Berlin on Hi-Fructose.

View Low Bros’ current show at BC Gallery in Berlin on Hi-Fructose.

277 Notes

John Chae’s Convoluted Digital Illustrations, now on our blog.

336 Notes

Jon Fox creates large-scale oil paintings that evoke Japanese illustration. Read more here.

146 Notes

The Damn USPS Priority shipping keeps increasing. But we still have you covered with our ultra popular Back Issue Bundles. Over 500 pages of Hi-Fructose sent to your Priority mail shipping included. GEt one before we run out here today and we will ship it tomorrow:http://store.hifructose.com/products/hi-fructose-back-issue-bundle

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245 Notes

Japanese artist Taisuke Mohri delicately renders portraits entirely in pencil, deliberately destroying the painstakingly detailed works’ precision by making the portraits appear cracked and smudged. These illusions shroud Mohri’s pouty-lipped protagonists in mystery. They seem simultaneously foreign and familiar, like the feeling one gets when browsing through strangers’ old family photos in an antique store. While most of his work is monochromatic, when adding color, Mohri uses only colored pencils, though the result could easily be mistaken for an oil painting. Take a look at some of Mohri’s work below.
MORE: http://hifructose.com/2013/07/30/taisuke-mohris-mysterious-graphite-portraits/

Japanese artist Taisuke Mohri delicately renders portraits entirely in pencil, deliberately destroying the painstakingly detailed works’ precision by making the portraits appear cracked and smudged. These illusions shroud Mohri’s pouty-lipped protagonists in mystery. They seem simultaneously foreign and familiar, like the feeling one gets when browsing through strangers’ old family photos in an antique store. While most of his work is monochromatic, when adding color, Mohri uses only colored pencils, though the result could easily be mistaken for an oil painting. Take a look at some of Mohri’s work below.

MORE: http://hifructose.com/2013/07/30/taisuke-mohris-mysterious-graphite-portraits/