Hi-Fructose Magazine Avatar

Posts tagged art

122 Notes

LA mural organizers Branded Arts are curating an enormous pop-up show for a good cause. Featuring some of the most talked-about artists from the street art and new contemporary art movements, the event will take place the night of October 25 at Hollywood’s TCL Chinese Theatre. One can expect to find stencil works by Banksy hanging next to Andrew Hem’s luminous paintings, Dabs Myla’s cartoony creations, Buff Monster’s jolly blobs and Swoon’s assemblages, just to name a few examples. Plus, Talib Kweli will be DJing. Proceeds from the event will benefit Vista Del Mar Child and Family Services. Take a look at a sneak peek of the artwork in the show on Hi-Fructose.

327 Notes

Thursday night’s opening of Alex Gross’s “Future Tense” at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York’s Chelsea district greeted viewers with a heavy dose of consumer culture. The exhibition initially comes off as accessible and playfully reflective of modern addictions, yet the works as a group are rather grim and much harder to swallow than their glossy, candy-colored exteriors would suggest. Read more on Hi-Fructose.

115 Notes

Turn The Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose Exhibition

image

(above image by Martin Wittfooth) 
We’re pleased to Announce: Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose at the The Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA)! See more here and more info. coming soon!: http://www.virginiamoca.org/turn-page-first-ten-years-hi-fructose
MAY 30, 2016 – DEC. 27, 2016

The Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) will feature some of the foremost contemporary artists through a ten year retrospective of the art magazine, Hi-Fructose. This exhibition is a unique opportunity to bring a broad spectrum of artwork by over 50 artists from the pages of magazines and computer screens to the walls of a contemporary art museum dedicated to educating on the significant art of today. Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose is a collaborative initiative by two like-minded organizations – MOCA in Virginia Beach, Virginia, and Hi-Fructose The New Contemporary Art Magazine in San Francisco, California.

201 Notes

Curated by artist Gromyko Semper, “Endangered Visions” is a group show with a wide breadth of artists but a short longevity. Set to premiere at ManilART, the Philippines’ largest annual art fair, October 15 through 19, the show features dozens of Filipino and international artists who work with surreal imagery, albeit in vastly different ways. “‘Endangered Visions’ seeks to counterbalance an art world driven by a rapacious market with something more contemplative, subtle and challenging,” said Semper in an email to Hi-Fructose. In addition to organizing the show, he will be one of the exhibiting artists alongside Jana Brike, Teiji Hayama, Kirsten Stingle and many others. Take a look at our preview on Hi-Fructose.

365 Notes

Modern day mermaids, Victor Grasso’s subjects are painted with accoutrements culled from the deep. One model sits in a graceful yet slouchy pose that evokes the dramatic posturing of both Renaissance portraiture and fashion editorials. A shark’s jaw bones frame her face like a couture accessory that complements her ruffled gown and sheer veil. In other pieces, shiny, sinewy squid bodies make headdresses and stoles for women who, bafflingly, seem to wear them with confidence and ease. Grasso (who is self-taught, by the way) paints these characters with a photorealist quality, creating stark contrasts that evoke the reflections a bright flash causes on skin. The artist will have two new pieces featured in the group show “Size Matters,” opening at New York’s Arcadia Contemporary on October 16, and is currently working on a painting that will be shown atHashimoto Contemporary in San Francisco for the “LAX/SFO” group show curated byThinkspace, opening on October 31. See more on Hi-Fructose.

Modern day mermaids, Victor Grasso’s subjects are painted with accoutrements culled from the deep. One model sits in a graceful yet slouchy pose that evokes the dramatic posturing of both Renaissance portraiture and fashion editorials. A shark’s jaw bones frame her face like a couture accessory that complements her ruffled gown and sheer veil. In other pieces, shiny, sinewy squid bodies make headdresses and stoles for women who, bafflingly, seem to wear them with confidence and ease. Grasso (who is self-taught, by the way) paints these characters with a photorealist quality, creating stark contrasts that evoke the reflections a bright flash causes on skin. The artist will have two new pieces featured in the group show “Size Matters,” opening at New York’s Arcadia Contemporary on October 16, and is currently working on a painting that will be shown atHashimoto Contemporary in San Francisco for the “LAX/SFO” group show curated byThinkspace, opening on October 31. See more on Hi-Fructose.

516 Notes

Sometimes life throws a wrench into our comfy plans and we’re faced with some big questions. As an artist, the question often is – do I quit and accept the defeat? Or, do I rise up triumphantly and make something beautiful to recapture this moment? Anthony Hurd is an artist that has learned to embrace the surprises in life as well as in his work, creating images that seem to arrive to us from some distant land. He depicts psychedelic landscapes of perilous beauty.

From his studio in the southwest plains of Texas, Hurd is currently busy creating works from a source of “dark optimism.” His free-flowing process reflects the unfettered nature of the work he creates. In the exclusive interview on our blog, Hurd discusses the evolution of his process and the difficulties he has faced in his journey. Read more.

371 Notes

Though their styles differ, Hikari Shimoda (featured in HF Vol. 29) and Camilla D’Erricoeach use a fluorescent color palette and childlike, illustrative imagery to apprehend adult anxieties. The two artists teamed up for their two-person show “Niji Bambini” (which combines Japanese and Italian, the artists’ native tongues, to translate to “Rainbow Children”), opening at Brooklyn’s Cotton Candy Machine on October 10. See more on Hi-Fructose.

323 Notes

Idyllic paintings of daily life set centuries ago are spliced with a dystopian sci-fi fantasy in German artist Jakub Rozalski’s work. Nostalgic elements clash with futuristic ones as giant robots invade the European countryside. Soldiers, armed with rifles and on horseback, are powerless against the mechanical beasts. Unlike much sci-fi inspired work, Rozalski’s paintings have a painterly quality to them that evokes the loose expressiveness of Impressionism. He convincingly inserts the robots into scenes that would otherwise appear straight out of the late 19th or early 20th century, inviting viewers to imagine a starkly different version of history than the one we know today. See more on Hi-Fructose.

1244 Notes

The forces of good and evil clash in an apocalyptic new group show, “The Fall of the Watchers,” at Philadelphia’s Arch Enemy Arts. The concept of the exhibit was inspired by the Book of Enoch, an ancient Jewish text that details the tale of the Watchers, angels sent to Earth and subsequently corrupted by humanity’s hedonistic ways. While the work in “The Fall of the Watchers” is not overtly religious or even moralistic, artists like David Seidman, Caitlin Hackett, Chris Mars and Maria Teicher created a creeping, ominous mood reflective of the show’s inspiration. The participants vary greatly in style and media — from watercolor to miniature sculpture — but their work shares an underlying tension and sense of foreboding. “The Fall of the Watchers” is on view through November 2. Take a look at some work from the show on Hi-Fructose.

The forces of good and evil clash in an apocalyptic new group show, “The Fall of the Watchers,” at Philadelphia’s Arch Enemy Arts. The concept of the exhibit was inspired by the Book of Enoch, an ancient Jewish text that details the tale of the Watchers, angels sent to Earth and subsequently corrupted by humanity’s hedonistic ways. While the work in “The Fall of the Watchers” is not overtly religious or even moralistic, artists like David Seidman, Caitlin Hackett, Chris Mars and Maria Teicher created a creeping, ominous mood reflective of the show’s inspiration. The participants vary greatly in style and media — from watercolor to miniature sculpture — but their work shares an underlying tension and sense of foreboding. “The Fall of the Watchers” is on view through November 2. Take a look at some work from the show on Hi-Fructose.

377 Notes

Demonic goddesses and amorphous love children dominate the compositions by Japanese-born, San Francisco-based artist Junko Mizuno (featured on the cover of HF Vol. 23). Mizuno has an expansive oeuvre, which spans such media as graphic novels and television animation. Her original paintings, in addition to wood, giclee and silkscreen prints, will for the first time be seen in London during the artist’s retrospective, “Belle: The Art of Junko Mizuno,” opening October 20 at Atomica Gallery. Read more on Hi-Fructose.

Demonic goddesses and amorphous love children dominate the compositions by Japanese-born, San Francisco-based artist Junko Mizuno (featured on the cover of HF Vol. 23). Mizuno has an expansive oeuvre, which spans such media as graphic novels and television animation. Her original paintings, in addition to wood, giclee and silkscreen prints, will for the first time be seen in London during the artist’s retrospective, “Belle: The Art of Junko Mizuno,” opening October 20 at Atomica Gallery. Read more on Hi-Fructose.