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511 Notes

zeroing:

Maya Hayuk

440 Notes

generic-art:

Alec Huxley

Go Ask Alice, 2014

Astronomical Menagerie, 2013

God of War, 2013

413 Notes

Emerging NYC-based artist Lala Abaddon’s journey through the art world started with analog photography and poetry. The idea of creating works that carry more than one story always fascinated her, and Abaddon felt like she found the answer when she wove her first piece. Interested in the process of deconstruction and reconstruction, she decided to cut up multiple existing photographs and weave them into new images.

As Abaddon discovered, these pieces concealed the original photographs within the new, abstract compositions. They also had a unique texture that added a whole different dimension to flat photo prints. Soon enough, the works started getting bigger and the patterns started getting more complex and elaborate. Her initial woven works began as 8 by 10 inch pieces, hand cut using a ruler and a box cutter. Abaddon is now using a stationary rail cutter and has recently finished creating a composition that is comprised of two 30 by 40 inch weaves. This work, along with a couple of other new ones, will be exhibited at a group show organized by Mecka NYC opening tomorrow at Hotel Particulier. Read more on Hi-Fructose.

686 Notes

Well-known horror fiction author Clive Barker has an exhibition opening this weekend at Century Gild in Culvery City. Take a look at his work on Hi-Fructose.

151 Notes

Calling it highly anticipated would be an understatement: even the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago’s website has a timer counting down the seconds until the US debut of David Bowie’s first museum retrospective, “David Bowie Is,” on September 23. The genre-defying artist has not only left a major mark on pop music, but the worlds of fashion, art, theater and design as well. The gigantic exhibition will pay homage to Bowie with immersive, multi-sensory installations, objects from Bowie’s life, his notebooks (where many lyrics were scrawled), photography, as well as elaborate costumes from his most prominent tours. Organized by the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the exhibition will offer a glimpse of five decades of David Bowie as a cultural phenomenon. See more on Hi-Fructose.

270 Notes

In Brazilian artist Lucio Carvalho's photo illustrations, imagery from favelas invades picturesque views of the world's cultural centers, confronting the viewer with the effects of poverty. See more on Hi-Fructose.

516 Notes

Mark Gmehling’s 3D-rendered creations are instantly recognizable for their playful textures: rubbery legs that weave and stretch; gummy bodies that bounce off the floor; goo that drips and metal that glimmers. The artist (see our extensive interview in our current issue, Hi-Fructose Vol. 32) began as an analog illustrator and even cites graffiti as an early influence. These days, his digital illustrations lay the groundwork for prints, murals and sculptures. Gmehling has an exhibition titled “Plastic” opening tonight at RWE in his hometown of Dortmund, Germany filled with satirical, off-kilter pieces. More on Hi-Fructose.

227 Notes

Both based in Berlin by way of Australia, Two One and Reka (see our recent studio visit here) are exhibiting together at StolenSpace Gallery in London in two concurrent solo shows: Reka’s “Trip the Light” and Two One’s “The Hunted Hunter’s Head.” Read more on Hi-Fructose.

196 Notes

Vesod and Morten Andersen are two painters who refuse to let time stand still. While the former works with figures that seem to move like slowed-down frames in an animation (Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase comes to mind), the latter fractures abstract forms that seem to shape-shift before our eyes. Currently on view at LA’s C.A.V.E. Gallery, Vesod and Morten Andersen’s two-person show “Remix Every Second” is an exploration of the ways the two artists can distort viewers’ experiences and even perhaps make them reflect on their perceptions of reality. Take a look at some opening night photos from “Remix Every Second” and see the show before it closes on September 6. More on Hi-Fructose

218 Notes

There, but not really. That’s the context for Barcelona-born artist Jaume Plensa’s public sculptures. They might seem like intrusions. They’re large. They’re set where people congregate. And the figures themselves are huge monumental heads. They sit in business districts and in front of an art museum. They emerge from the ocean. They hover above unsuspecting pedestrians. They rest in the neighborhood that surrounds the Venice Biennale. Read more on Hi-Fructose.