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125 Notes

What a special gift for someone special, including yourself! This brooch features Mark Ryden’s “Daisy” drawing from “The Gay 90s: West” exhibition (see our coverage here) and is now available in the Hi-Fructose online store. The brooch features a mineral crystal dome and a solid metal back custom stamped with Mark’s logo and a safety pin style attachment. It comes in a black velvet pouch and box with a certificate of authenticity. Check it out in our shop.

308 Notes

Kehinde Wiley’s (Hi-Fructose Vol. 29) opulent portraiture subtly stirs the status quo. As an American artist, Wiley honed his craft in accordance with a legacy of Euro-centric art history that left him simultaneously awed and alienated. One would be hard-pressed to find a grandiose portrait of a person of color in the works of the Renaissance masters in the Met or the Louvre. This is the motivating factor of Wiley’s oeuvre: to elevate images of average people of African descent through his ornate depictions, exposing the singular beauty of his subjects through dramatic compositions that evoke the Baroque period.

While he started out this aesthetic exploration by scouting subjects in major US cities, Wiley’s art has taken him all over the world to work with people of the global African diaspora. His latest series, “The World Stage: Haiti” is currently on view at Roberts & Tilton Gallery in Culver City and features 12 new paintings based on his recent travels. Read more on Hi-Fructose

1834 Notes

Kyle Thompson is a young photographer on the rise. He began shooting at age 19 in his hometown of Chicago, Illinois, and in the last couple years has amassed a substantial body of work that shows a surprisingly adept and concise voice for such a young artist. This work, just released in a book titled Somewhere Else is comprised mostly of self-portraits taken in various abandoned locations found while on a road trip traveling the country. Read our exclusive interview on Hi-Fructose.

1134 Notes

London-based illustrator and artist Martin Tomsky turns the dancing line of the pen into dynamic sculpture with his multi-layered woodcuts. See more on Hi-Fructose.

229 Notes

This Saturday, CHG Circa will debut “Giants Among Us,” a group show that challenged artists to interpret the figure of the giant and how it plays out in folklore, contemporary culture and their own mythology. Read more on Hi-Fructose.

151 Notes

Robots battle in a world that seems simultaneously prehistoric and futuristic in Rob Sato’s watercolors. The artist (first featured in HF Vol. 16) defies the limitations of his medium both in content and in format. While watercolor paintings are typically kept small, he works at mural scale, rendering the precise outlines of his giant robots, warriors on horseback and bizarre humanoid characters. The softness of the watercolor is still there, adding a handmade touch to his mechanical subject matter. Sato’s latest exhibition “Curses” opens on September 20 at Martha Otero Gallery in LA and features several massive works, folded paintings that become sculptural objects, some simplified sketches and painted baseballs that seem to take their cue from the cave walls of Lascaux. Take a look at our preview on Hi-Fructose.

1279 Notes

English artist Chris Wood creates glass wall-panels that showcase maze-like structures that give the illusion of depth and brilliance through the glass’ interaction with natural and artificial light sources. The artist’s usage of small, reflective, dichroic (meaning “two color”) pieces of glass lets her easily create complex patterns of light and shade; the colors and textures that derive from these structures change in accordance to the position of the viewer and the angle of the light source, making her work an ever-changing, almost magical and intriguing phenomenon. Read more on Hi-Fructose.

343 Notes

A large, abandoned Victorian hospital in the heart of Sao Paulo, Cidade Matarazzo became an artists’ playground for the project “Made by Brazilians.” Kenny Scharf, Arne Quinze, Joana Vasconcelos, Charley Case, Saner and others transformed the building with immersive installations in the weeks leading up to the Sao Paulo Biennial. Before plans to remodel the estate are put into effect, viewers are welcome to visit the space through October 11. Read more on Hi-Fructose.

397 Notes

Berlin-based artist Reka recently travelled to London for his current solo show “Trip the Light” at StolenSpace Gallery (see our preview here) and left a mural behind in the Shoreditch district. While the graceful movements of dancers’ bodies served as the inspiration for the paintings in Reka’s exhibition, the mural took on a more playful, illustrative look despite its shared Modernist aesthetic. Over a black background, Reka painted free-flowing, abstract forms. Some of them emerge as illustrations of specific objects — a fish head, a chess piece with an all-seeing eye — while others keep the viewer asking questions. Is that a spray can with the punk slogan ACAB? The whimsical piece is intended to keep us guessing. See more on Hi-Fructose.

154 Notes

While most people’s experiences with animals involve encountering the domesticated or captive sort, DALeast depicts an animal world far from the civilized, cute and cuddly version we humans like to imagine in his current solo show, “The Laten Photon,” at New York City’s Jonathan LeVine Gallery. With his abstracted, high-contrast paintings, the Chinese-born, South African-based artist presents a high-intensity drama of predators and prey. Known for his monochromatic street art, in which gleaming, ribbon-like black lines coalesce into expressionistic animal silhouettes, DAL departed from his typical color palette and worked with rich hues of eggplant, indigo and burgundy in addition to his signature tea-stained linen. The title of the exhibition comes from quantum physics, where the photon is defined as a particle that creates light and makes matter visible to the human eye. The title speaks to DAL’s continual interest in transformation and evolution. See more on Hi-Fructose.

While most people’s experiences with animals involve encountering the domesticated or captive sort, DALeast depicts an animal world far from the civilized, cute and cuddly version we humans like to imagine in his current solo show, “The Laten Photon,” at New York City’s Jonathan LeVine Gallery. With his abstracted, high-contrast paintings, the Chinese-born, South African-based artist presents a high-intensity drama of predators and prey. Known for his monochromatic street art, in which gleaming, ribbon-like black lines coalesce into expressionistic animal silhouettes, DAL departed from his typical color palette and worked with rich hues of eggplant, indigo and burgundy in addition to his signature tea-stained linen. The title of the exhibition comes from quantum physics, where the photon is defined as a particle that creates light and makes matter visible to the human eye. The title speaks to DAL’s continual interest in transformation and evolution. See more on Hi-Fructose.